FORMS OF POETRY – OLD – NEW & RECENTLY INVENTED

me said nature
created the spoken word
transcribe it wisely

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FORMS OF POETRY OLD NEW & RECENTLY INVENTED
Formats  A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

INTRODUCTION
There are many, many forms of poetry, I have only skimmed the surface. Listed here are mainly short forms, the odd long form also gets a mention, but even the demure haiku can be built up to form a many versed poem. The alphabet link selection is a quick means of locating a group as they are not in alphabetical order on the page, and will hopefully save a bit of scrolling. New forms will be added as and when. Should have a favourite and it is not listed drop it off in the comment box, and I will add it, same goes for any you have invented. Re the latter there are three new inventions already on board, ‘Serpent’s Tail’ and Three Squared’ both by Jane Dougherty. I have an invention of my own up too, ‘Epanalepsis’. I have a lot of catching up to do however, this page will always be work in progress.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
Back to Alphabetical Form Links
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Rules/Guidelines
ABC PoetryAlliterisenAlphabet HaikuAtom Poetry
Blank VerseBlitz
CinquainClerihew PoetryCollom luneConcrete
Diamante – Diminished IambicDiminished Hexiverse
ElfjeEnclosed RhymeEpanalepsisEpigramEpulaeryu
FootleFree Verse
Grook Poetry
HaikuHay(na)ku
Idyll (Idyl) Poetry
Jueju
Kelly luneKimoKyrielle PoemsKyrielle Sonnet’sKwansaba
LanturneLentoLast WordLimerick
Müki
NinetteNonet
OdeOttava Rima
Pantoumpi ku
QuaternQuestionkuQuintain: (English)
Rhyming WaveRondeau
SeptoletSerpent’s TailSnowball
TanagaTankatau kuTeonoTerzanelleTerza rimaTetractysThe American 767Three SquaredTilusTrichainTrioletTritinaTyburn
Villanelle
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Blitz Poetry: A form of poetry created by poet Robert Keim in 2008. It is a 50-line poem of short phrases and images. The “Blitz” poem is well-named, as the fifty short lines are read in rapid-fire fashion. “The form really relies on sound and rapid “flow.” ~Rob Keim.
Here are the rules:

  • Line 1 should be one short phrase or image (like “build a boat”)
  • Line 2 should be another short phrase or image using the same first word as the first word in Line 1 (something like “build a house”)
  • Lines 3 and 4 should be short phrases or images using the last word of Line 2 as their first words (so Line 3 might be “house for sale” and Line 4 might be “house for rent”)
  • Lines 5 and 6 should be short phrases or images using the last word of Line 4 as their first words, and so on until you’ve made it through 48 lines
  • Line 49 should be the last word of Line 48
  • Line 50 should be the last word of Line 47
  • The title of the poem should be three words long and follow this format: (first word of Line 3) (preposition or conjunction) (first word of line 47)
  • There should be no punctuation, except for an ellipse after the final two words in lines 49 & 50.

Back to: Love Have FunSad Life Done
REMEMBERING PLANET EARTHEQUALITY – REASONS – FACTS
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Clerihew Poetry
A Clerihew (or clerihew) is a very specific kind of short humorous verse, typically with the following properties: It is biographical and usually whimsical, showing the subject from an unusual point of view; but it is hardly ever satirical, abusive or obscene; It has four lines of irregular length (for comic effect); The first line consists solely (or almost solely) of a well-known person’s name.
Back to Who Do You Do
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Concrete Poems
A concrete poem is one that takes the shape of the object it describes. This is different from a Shape poem, in that a Shape poem does NOT have to take the shape of the object it describes.
Back to A Daffodil
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Teono Poetry Rules
Teono poetry derived from the troiku invented by Chèvrefeuille. Chèvrefeuille’s troiku is based on the Roman troika, it being the carriage, which is drawn by three horses. Chèvrefeuille states only the first, the carriage/sledge, be represented by a haiku. The horses can also be haiku but don’t have to be, but must be three line stanzas. In my teono all stanza’s are haiku, and are laid out in the form of a hatchet, (Japanese (手斧), pronunciation ‘teono’. The main difference is the haiku in the shaft , it must be represented in the three stanzas that form the double bladed teono. To all of the stanza, haiku rules apply as in the 5,7,5 syllable count, no punctuation, no capitals proper nouns being the only exception.  An example:

TEONO: RESPITE

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. . . . . . new pond plants
. lotus introduced a year ago
. .awaiting summer blooms
—-new pond koi carp ———————————————–lotus leaves spread wide
introduced late springtime———————–blooms held high standing proud
—-a pair to breed——————————————————————-sunlit pink rubies
. . . . high summer
lotus leaves providing shade
. . . . koi carp respite

The teono head can be aligned to the left or right. The 3 haiku can be closed as above or line separated. The shaft to me looks nicer in bold text, writers choice.
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Cinquain
The modern cinquain is based on a word count of words of a certain type.
Line 1 has one word (the title).
Line 2 has two words that describe the title.
Line 3 has three words that tell the action.
Line 4 has four words that express the feeling
Line 5 has one word which recalls the title.
Example
cinquain
modern poetry
composing, writing, reading,
titillating, enchanting, enthralling, appealing
poem

The traditional cinquain is based on a syllable count. Twenty-Two syllables in the following pattern (2-4-6-8-2) The traditional cinquain is based on a syllable count. It has five lines, and often, one word in the first line, two words in the second line etc.

line 1 – 2 syllables
line 2 – 4 syllables
line 3 – 6 syllables
line 4 – 8 syllables
line 5 – 2 syllables
Syllable Example
fairies
natures keepers
caring sharing teaching
graceful winged wonders a delight
nightlights
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Terza rima
Terza rima is a verse form composed of iambic tercets (three-line groupings). The rhyme scheme for this form of poetry is “aba bcb cdc, etc.” The second line of each tercet sets the rhyme for the following tercet, and thus supplying the verse with a common thread, a way to link the stanzas. The only time the form changes is at the conclusion of the poem, where the terza rima ends with either a single line or couplet repeating the rhyme of the middle line of the final tercet (like d or dd). There is no limit to the number of lines in terza rime.
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Diminished Hexaverse
Rules
A poem containing stanzas of 5 lines, then 4 lines, then 3 lines, then 2 lines, ending with one word. The syllables in each stanza correspond to the number of lines, i.e. 5 in each line in the first stanza, 4 in the second stanza and so on. This form may contain more than five stanzas. Back to Alphabetical Form Links
Pantoum
A rare form of poetry similar to a villanelle. It is composed of a series of four-line stanzas; the second and fourth lines of the first stanza are the first and third lines of the next. This pattern continues for any number of stanzas, except for the final stanza, which differs in the repeating pattern. The first and third lines of the last stanza are the second and fourth of the penultimate (next to last stanza); the first line of the poem is the last line of the final stanza, and the third line of the first stanza is the second of the final. Ideally, the meaning of lines shifts when they are repeated although the words remain exactly the same: this can be done by shifting punctuation, punning, or simply recontextualizing.
Nature The Beginning
The world struck… the moon a he!
Nature was born after that disaster.
How old our mother, how old is she?
Back then she grew so much faster.

Nature-born after the disaster.
Nature, no life, not yet created.
Back then she grew so much faster.
The four seasons still sedated.
Nature, no life,, not yet created.
Spring summer, autumn, winter, when?
The four seasons still sedated,,
Springtime first life way back then.
Spring summer, autumn, winter, when?
Twas the oceans that set life free?
Springtime first life way back then.
The world struck… the moon a he
©  Mick E Talbot 2017
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Diamante
Rules
The purpose is to go from the subject at the top of the diamond to another totally different (and sometimes opposite) subject at the bottom. A seven line poem, shaped like a diamond.

Example

Line 1: Winter = 1 NOUN-A
Line 2: Rainy, cold = 2 ADJECTIVES-A
Line 3: Skiing, skating, sledding = 3 GERUNDS-A (verb + -ing)
Line 4: Mountains, wind, breeze, ocean = 2 NOUNS-A + 2 NOUNS-B
Line 5: Swimming, surfing, scuba diving = 3 GERUNDS-B (verb + -ing)
Line 6: Sunny, hot = 2 ADJECTIVES-B
Line 7: Summer = 1 NOUN-B
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How to Write Elfje:
An ‘Elfje’ counts as five sentences:
Line 1. One word. This word symbolizes a colour or feature. The word symbolizes the atmosphere.
Line 2. Two words. These are something or someone with this colour or feature.
Line 3. Three words. Giving more information about the person or the object. You describe where the person or the object is, who the person or what the object is, or what the person or object is doing. This sentence usually starts with the word ‘he’, ‘she’ or ‘it.’
Line 4. Four words. Here you are writing something about yourself in relation to the person or the object. This sentence is your conclusion.
Line 5. One word. This word is called the ‘Bomb.’ It is the essence of the poem.
The example of a pure Elfje most often found on the Internet is:
Yellow
the eyes
in the dark
Is there a cat?
Miauw.
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Tritina
Definition
The Tritina is a modern form created by cutting down the Sestina. Like a Sestina this form repeats the end words of each stanza. The form is made up of three triplets these use an end word order of 1-2-3,3-1-2,2-3-1. After the triplets comes an envoi constructed from a single line. All four end words must appear in this envoi in the order 1-2-3.

1 2 3 – End words of lines in first tercet.
3 1 2 – End words of lines in second tercet.
2 3 1 – End words of lines in third tercet.
(1 2 3) – Words contained in the final line.
Example:NATURAL ALARMS

The robin sings, the dawn awakes.
Jenny Wren sings so much louder!
All wildlife rises to face the day.

The sun, nights respite, warms the day.
The dawn chorus every soul awakes.
Buzzing bees, all wildlife getting louder!

Rookery rooks set off, they caw louder!
Dawn chorus falls silent, calm now the day.
Sun now warmer, wildflowers it awakes.

Fox calling, awakes louder noises, afore the day.
© Mick Talbot 2017
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A Snowball:
Start with any word, add additional words below the starting word one (1) letter longer
An example:
WRITE
write
poetry
inspire
aspiring
composers
vigilantly
remodelling
titillations
tantalisingly
quintessential
© Mick E Talbot 2017/66
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Tilus [tee-loo-hz] is a form created by Kelvin S.M. and falls under the category of micro poetry.
The form is divided into two parts: the first part is composed of two lines following a 6-3 syllable
count; the second part, a one-syllable word to close and/or complete the subject layered in the first part.
The whole piece must, only, contain 10 in overall syllable count.
The main focus of Tilus is on the world of Nature,
and how it can open a new door to a wider understanding of life and beyond.
The form aims to be epic in emotions expressed, more importantly, than to be epic in words.
by Kelvin S.M.: http://kelvinsm.blogspot.nl/

carp all down… seeking warmth
fall… winter

cold
~
turned yellow… orange… red
autumn tree’s

bared
Both © Mick E Talbot 2017/66
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Septolet:
The Septolet is a poem consisting of seven lines containing fourteen words with a break in between the two parts. Both parts deal with the same thought and create a picture.

geese,
gaggling, one calls,
migration starts,
instinctively driven.

warmer
climes, for a
warmer winter.
© Mick E Talbot 2017/66
Gaggling
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Alphabet Haiku:
Modern haiku form created by Beatrice Evans, aka Ronnica at Allpoetry
It requires only strict 5 7 5 syllable construction
with all words beginning with the same letter.

delinquent driver
drives down dusty desert dune
difficult driving
~
clever cats can climb
cliffs… craters… cuboards… chests
chasing chaffinches
~
avid art adorned
archways… attractive aqua
arthropodae acts
© Mick Talbot 2017

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Atom Poetry:
Three line stanzas=tercets.
Count letters: 5-7-5.
No punctuation or capitalization like haiku.
Atom Series
lucky
didn’t die
saved
~
caped
tiny red
a miss
~
truth
nothing
but it
~
to lie
pervert
fault
~
water
support
float
© Mick E Talbot 2017
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Kelly lune – Syllable 5, 3, 5
EXTINCTION
mother natures laws
don’t break them…
no fines… extinction
© Mick E Talbot 2017
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Collom lune – Word count 3,5,3
EXTINCTION
mother natures laws
don’t break them… or pay
no fines… extinction
© Mick E Talbot 2017
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tau ku:
3 line tercet, using syllables 6,2,8,

Example:

fresh on the road… blood
dead fox…
run over… no… hunted by hounds
© Mick E Talbot 2017
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pi ku:
(1/2 of a tau ku): 1/3 2/1 3/4, an example:

dead red fox…
ragged…
found on the road
© Mick E Talbot 2017
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The American 767:
The American 767 created by Dennis L. Dean.
A tristich, a poem in 3 lines. 7-6-7 syllables per line, unrhymed.
Must contain the name of a bug, (creepy crawly). An example:
PAINTED LADIES
butterflies… many species
painted ladies… so fresh
once abundant… now threatened
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Tetractys
Tetractys, a poetic form invented by Ray Stebbing, consists of at least 5 lines of 1, 2, 3, 4, 10 syllables (total of 20). Tetractys can be written with more than one verse, but must follow suit with an inverted syllable count. Tetractys can also bereversed and written 10, 4, 3, 2, 1.
Double Tetractys: 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 10, 4, 3, 2, 1
Triple Tetractys: 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 10, 4, 3, 2, 1, 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, and so on. The tetractys could be Britain’s answer to the haiku. Its challenge is to express a complete thought, profound or comic, witty or wise, within the narrow compass of twenty syllables.” – Ray Stebbing. An example of a double:

WHY NUCLEAR?
why
nuclear
power is
a threat to all
its radioactive contamination
it has a half-life of one hundred years
unviable
habitat
barren
dead
© Mick E Talbot 2017
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Lanturne
The Lanturne is a five-line verse shaped like a Japanese lantern with a syllabic pattern of 1, 2, 3, 4, 1. An example:
LOVE
love
too love
love all life
the wonders of
love
© Mick E Talbot 2017
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Triolet:
A Triolet is a poetic form consisting of only 8 lines. Within a Triolet, the 1st, 4th, and 7th lines repeat, and the 2nd and 8th lines do as well. The rhyme scheme is simple: ABaAabAB, capital letters representing the repeated lines.

Make writing a Triolet more challenging! Make each line 8 syllables in length (4 metrical feet), written in iambic tetrameter (the more common way), or try it in pentameter (English version) where each line only has 10 syllables (5 metrical feet).
An 8 syllable example:
LOVES JOURNEY
Loves journey, fresh life together,
So many treasures, daughters, sons.
Hands clinging, soft as a feather.
Loves journey, fresh life together.
Refreshing sun, lovers weather.
Make beautiful love don’t dither.
Loves journey, fresh life together,
So many treasures, daughters, sons.
© Mick E Talbot 2017
A 10 syllable example:
FREE FLOATING
Oceans from distant shores currents, its guide.
Or winds can change turning its  direction
Waves roll  they foam, drenching, spray-filled skyline
Drifting from distant shores currents, its guide.
It hears the roar of waves crashing, raving!
Little ripples thought we’ve been before, blushing
Drifting from distant shores currents, its guide.
Or winds can change turning its  direction
© Mick E Talbot 2017
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Alliterisen
The Alliterisen (Complex and Rhyming), a form created by Udit Bhatia, is a simple seven-lined poem with a specific syllable pattern and two alliterations per line. For example: Glorious Graves, and wonderful waves. Alliteration is the succession of similar consonant sounds. They are not recognized by spelling, but rather by sounds. The syllable structure for the Complex Alliterisen is as follows:

HASTILY HIDING
WISELY WAITING

flying fish are really gliding gracefully so
frantically from so many predatory piranhas
silkily sliding into the most fearsome fray
hastily hiding in very thick growing sightly sedges
wisely waiting until the predators pass
satisfyingly safe start to safely fly feeding
dusk darkening welcoming much needed silent sleep
© Mick Talbot 2017
Rhyming Alliterisen consists of 7 lines, with 7 syllables each, and has one alliteration in every line. The rhyme scheme as follows: aabbccd.
DUTY DONE
warily watching panning
one meercat sharply scanning
gallantly guarding buddies
from all the big bad hoodies
falcons flying cats hunting
sneaky snakes, wild boars grunting
duty done feeding time fun
© Mick E Talbot 2017/66
<!–RHYMING ALLITERISEN–>
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Rhyming Wave
By Lawrence Eberhart | August 29, 2015 |
The Rhyming Wave is a poetry form created by Katharine L. Sparrow, American writer and poet who writes on Allpoetry.com.
The Rhyming Wave is:
Stanzaic: Consisting of 2 or more quatrains plus an ending couplet.
Metric: Lines 1 through 3 are Iambic tetrameter and
line 4 is iambic trimeter.
Refrained: Syllables 6 & 7 of line one are repeated as syllables 2 thru 7
and syllable 8 is the same in both lines and syllables 1 & 2 are of line 3 are repeated in line 4
Refrain: The ending couplet is the first and the last line of the previous stanzas.
NOTE: The author is amenable to having poets substitute rhyming as well as identical syllables. I have done so in my example poem.
Rhymed: Rhyme scheme Aaab BBbc CCd AD, where the capital letters represent refrain words or refrain lines.
Here is the author’s own explanation. At the end I have included a visual template that may help some.
The Rhyming Wave is a form of my own invention. The instructions seem complicated, but once you start writing it, you will get it pretty quickly.
A Rhyming Wave is so named because words repeat themselves, similar to waves lapping over and over again on the shore.
A Rhyming Wave has at least 2 verses and an ending couplet. Each verse is four lines with the first three written in iambic tetrameter (4 “feet” of 2 syllables each) and the fourth line three feet, or six syllables. The ending couplet will be the first and last lines of the poem repeated.
To write a Rhyming Wave you must know how to write in iambic meter. This is the da-DUM, da-DUM rhythm. If you don’t know how to do this, your Rhyming Wave may not come out sounding as it should. As with all iambic metered poems, it does not have to be PERFECT, but it should sound melodious to the ear.
– First line: 4 iambic feet (8 syllables)
She dwells among the foamy swells,
– Second line: syllables 6 and 7 of line one are repeated as syllables 2 through 7 (three times) and syllable 8 is also repeated as syllable 8.
the foamy, foamy, foamy swells–
– Third line: 4 iambic feet (8 syllables) last syllable rhymes with last syllable of lines one and two
Beneath the cresting waves she dwells,
– Fourth line: first 2 to 3 syllables (whichever fits) of line three are repeated/ six syllables only
beneath the ocean’s roll.
Verses 2 through 4, same pattern – first line of each verse rhymes with last line of previous verse:

Her song floats from a sandy shoal
a sandy, sandy, sandy shoal–
her voice that creeps into the soul,
her voice, a crooning trill.

And over all a misty chill
a misty, misty, misty chill–
she’ll sing again, it’s sure she will,
she’ll sing her haunting tune.

Her humming soothes the silver moon,
the silver, silver, silver moon,
where stars will span the ocean soon–
where stars will hear her song.

Ending couplet, first and last lines of the poem:

She dwells among the foamy swells,
where stars will hear her song.

* poem must have at least 2 verses, but there is no limit to the number of verses
ENTIRE POEM/ a Rhyming Wave:
Mermaid’s Song
She dwells among the foamy swells,
the foamy, foamy, foamy swells–
beneath the cresting waves she dwells,
beneath the ocean’s roll.

Her song floats from a sandy shoal
a sandy, sandy, sandy shoal–
her voice that creeps into the soul,
her voice, a crooning trill.

And over all a misty chill
a misty, misty, misty chill–
she’ll sing again, it’s sure she will,
she’ll sing her haunting tune.

Her humming soothes the silver moon,
the silver, silver, silver moon,
where stars will span the ocean soon–
where stars will hear her song.

She dwells among the foamy swells
where stars will hear her song.

Example #2/ a Rhyming Wave
Rose Covered
A cottage in the shady wood,
the shady, shady, shady wood–
amid soft, leafy arms it stood
amid the woodland trees.

Perfume hung on the hazy breeze
the hazy, hazy, hazy breeze
where roses opened for the bees
where roses blossomed red.

The roses climbed and gently spread,
and gently, gently, gently spread–
they made the walls a flower bed,
they made the cottage sweet.

A respite in the steamy heat,
the steamy, steamy, steamy heat–
a cool and comfortable retreat
a cool and quiet place.

A cottage in the shady wood,
a cool and quiet place.

My example:
Pleasant Quest
He waited for the perfect mate
the perfect, perfect, perfect mate
the one he would appreciate
the one he knew he’d find.

She’d have to have a caring mind
a daring, rare and caring mind
to make him leave his quest behind
to make him say, “It’s you!’

Enroute he took a playful view–
a playful, playful, playful view
before he chose to say, “I do”–
before he chose his bride.

He had a very pleasing ride–
a pleasing, teasing, pleasing ride
He mostly left girls satisfied.
He most enjoyed the search.

He waited for the perfect mate
He most enjoyed the search.
© Lawrencealot – August 27, 2015
Visual Template
Rhyming Wave
Rhyming Wave
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Trichain

The Trichain is a poetry form created by Lisa La Grange, writing on Allpoetry.com.A Trichain is: Stanzaic: Consisting of 3 or more quatrains.
Metered: Each quatrain consists of 3 lines of iambic tetrameter and one line of iambic trimeter.
Rhyme Scheme: aaab cccb dddb …Here is her original work.Beautiful Mystery

At times the heart is plagued by pains
that bind like cold corroding chains;
it seems the torment never wanes
and nothing brings respite.

But then amidst oppressive fears
and cold depression’s streaming tears,
the mystery of love appears,
exuding dulcet light.

And then the chains of grief and woe,
are melted by its crimson glow
and misery is forced to go;
defeated by delight.

For love obliterates the gloom
of shadows that appear to loom.
They fade in beauty’s brilliant bloom
as flames of hope ignite.

Pasted from http://allpoetry.com/poem/12098352-Beautiful-Mystery-by-Lisa-La-Grange
Example
The Girl and the Toad  (Trichain)

While down a rustic path I strode
I chanced upon a tuckered toad,
who’d stopped still sitting in the road,
which seemed a dangerous place.

He let me take him in my hand
and when I spoke, it was unplanned;
I did not think he’d understand
although that seemed the case.

Within my head I heard a sound,
a mellow voice that did confound;
the toad, the only one around
was staring at my face.

“You are as pretty as they come
so sitting here was not so dumb,
If you will kiss me I’ll become
a prince with charm and grace.”
© Lawrencealot – July 5, 2015
Visual Template
Trichain
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Terzanelle
The Terzanelle is a poetry type which is a combination of the villanelle and the terza rima forms. It is a 19-line poem consisting of five interlocking triplets/tercets plus a concluding quatrain in which the first and third lines of the first triplet appear as refrains. The middle line of each triplet is repeated, reappearing as the last line of the succeeding triplet with the exception of the center line of the next-to-the-last stanza which appears in the quatrain. The rhyme and refrain scheme for the triplets is as follows:

1. A
2. B
3. A
4. b
5. C
6. B

7. c
8. D
9. C

10. d
11. E
12. D

13. e
14. F
15. E

Ending Type 1:

16. f
17. A
18. F
19. A

Ending Type 2:

16. f
17. F
18. A
19. A
Each line of the poem should be the same metrical length.
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Müki:
As a haiku with no restraints, apart from the 3 lines. Still being checked out, but an example of how I have been led to believe it should be written: Since learnt that there are categories as follows:

Natural phenomena: In the example below shadow is the natural phenomena. For a list of natural phenomena please, click here, thank you.

i follow my shadow
your shadow  pushes me forward
following me

Physical Geography: In the example below marsh is the physical geography. For a list of physical geography please, click here thank you.

the marsh alive
frogs croaking calling dusk
the barn owl swoops
~~~~
the müki
lines as long as you like
but only three

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EPANALEPSIS POETRY:
A new form of poetry invented by me based on the definition of epanalepsis, which was an inadvertent gift from Stuart Aiken. For which I am very greatful, I have thanked him, and he has graciously acknowledged my invention, my thanks again Stuart!
The rules are based purely on the definition, which is the repetition of the same word/s at the beginning/end, within the same clause/sentence. The repetitions can fall across two sentences. The words don’t have be the same but they must be in contex,jump an hop, both referring to the same act. There are no restraints other than the repetitions. Any rhyming combination, layout from couplets to whatever style one feels will accommodate what you feel. Enjoy, and now an example:
MY GARDEN
my garden often inspires me to write poetry or proes doth my garden.
wildlife forays of the wild oft can’t beat my backyard for fauna.
wonder why, then you see them spraying, felling, I still wonder why
my garden where I am at one with nature, robins sing in my garden

© Mick Talbot 2017
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TANAGA
For more on this form, JulesPaige is promoting it on her page Poetry Forms Old and New.
Example:
many thoughts on pollution
any come to fruition
destruction of our climate
nature cannot compensate

© Mick E Talbot 2017/66

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Tyburn
A tyburn is a six line poem consisting of 2,2,2,2,9,9 syllables. The first four lines rhyme and are all descriptive words. The last two lines rhyme and incorporate the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 4th lines as the 5th to 8th syllables.
Example:
PRETTY WITTY HUMANS
pretty,
witty,
glitzy,
gritty,
that’s us, humans, pretty, witty, mad,
but most of all glitzy, gritty, bad.
© Mick Talbot 2017
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The Hay(na)ku Verse Form, a 21st-century poetry form.
History.
Invented by poet Eileen Tabios, who is also publisher, Meritage Press.
Officially inaugurated on the Web on June 12th, 2003 (Philippine Independence Day).
The form spread through the Web to poets all over the world.
Eileen Tabios initially called the form “the Pinoy Haiku”.
Vince Gotera proposed the name “hay(na)ku”, and this name has stuck. This corresponds to a Tagalog phrase that means roughly “Oh!” or (in Spanish) “Madre mÃ?­a”.
The last syllable is pronounced “ko” so maybe the final name will be even more independent of “hayku”: “hay(na)ko”.
Example.
Some from the anthology of Dan Waber’s:

Nothing
adds up.
Love isn’t math.

and Craig Freeman’s

Moonshine
And great
Quantities of hills.

Form.
In a traditional Hay(na)ku, there are:
A tercet: 3 lines.
A total of 6 words: 1 in the first line, 2 in the second line, and 3 in the third line.
There is no restriction on syllables or stressed or rhymes.
My example:
Nature
needs intervention,
else we die.
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Haiku
HAIKU (plural: haiku, from archaic Japanese): The term haiku is a fairly late addition to Japanese poetry. The poet Shiki coined the term in the nineteenth century from a longer, more traditional phrase, haikai renga no hokku (“the introductory lines of light linked verse”). To understand the haiku’s history as a genre, peruse the vocabulary entries for its predecessors, the hokku and the haikai renga or renku.
The haiku follows several conventions:

(1) The traditional Japanese haiku consists of three lines. The first line contains five syllables, the second line contains seven, and the last line five. In Japanese, the syllables are further restricted in that each syllable must have three sound units (sound-components formed of a consonant, a vowel, and another consonant). The three unit-rule is usually ignored in English haiku, since English syllables vary in size much more than in Japanese. Furthermore, in English translation, this 5/7/5 syllable count is occasionally modified to three lines containing 6/7/6 syllables respectively, since English is not as “compact” as Japanese.

(2) The traditional subject-matter is a Zen description of a location, natural phenomona, wildlife, or a common everyday occurrence. Insects and seasonal activities are particularly popular topics. If the subject-matter is something besides a scene from nature, or if it employs puns, elaborate symbols, or other forms of “cleverness,” the poem is technically a senryu rather than a haiku. The point was that the imagery presents a “Zen snapshot” of the universe, setting aside logic and thought for a flash of intuitive insight. The haiku seeks to capture the qualities of experiencing the natural world uncluttered by “ideas.” Often editors will talk about “the haiku moment”–that split second when we first experience something but before we begin to think about it. (In many ways, this idea might be contrasted usefully with the lyric moment in the English tradition of poetry; see lyric).

(3) The haiku is always set during a particular season or month as indicated by a kigo, or traditional season-word. This brief (and often subtle) reference to a season or an object or activity associated with that time of year establishes the predominant mood of the poem.

(4) It is striking a feature of the haiku that direct discussion of the poem’s implications is forbidden, and symbolism or wordplay discouraged in a manner alien to Western poetry. The poet describes her subject in an unusual manner without making explicit commentary or explicit moral judgment. To convey such ideas, the genre often relies upon allusions to earlier haiku or implies a comparison between the natural setting and something else. Simplicity is more valued than “cleverness.” Again, if the poet is being clever, using puns or symbols, the poem again is technically a senryu rather than a haiku.

(5) The poet often presents the material under a nom de plume rather than using her own name–especially in older haiku.

(6) Additionally, the haiku traditionally employ “the technique of cutting”–i.e., a division in thought between the earlier and later portions of the poem. (It is comparable to the volta of a sonnet). These two divisions must be able to stand independently from the other section, but each one must also enrich the reader’s understanding of the other section. In English translation, this division is often indicated through punctuation marks such as a dash, colon, semicolon, or ellipsis.

Here is an example of a haiku by a Western writer, James Kirkup:
In the amber dusk
Each island dreams its own night–
The sea swarms with gold.

The following poem serves as an example very loosely translated from Japanese:
Yagate shinu
Keshiki wamiezu
Semi no koe
[O cricket, from your cheery cry
No one could ever guess
How quickly you must die.]

This example illustrates the haiku’s lack of authorial commentary or explanation–the desire merely to present the experience of nature:

Samidare wo
Atsumete hayashi
Mogami-gawa
[Gathering all
The rains of May
The swift Mogami River.
Many Japanese poets have used the form, the two acknowledged masters being Bashó (a nom de plume for Matsuo Munefusa, 1644-94); and Kobayashi Issa (a nom de plume for Kobayashi Nobuyuki). The Imagist Movement in 20th century English literature has been profoundly influenced by haiku. The list of poets who attempted the haiku or admired the genre includes Ezra Pound, Amy Lowell, Robert Frost, Conrad Aiken, and W. B. Yeats. Contrast haiku with the tanka and the senryu. See also hokku, below, and haikai, above. See also kigo and imagism. You can click here to download a PDF handout summarizing this discussion of haiku, or you can click here to download PDF samples of haiku.
Example
An example of classic hokku by Bashô:
an old pond—
the sound of a frog jumping
into water
Another Bashô classic:
the first cold shower;
even the monkey seems to want
a little coat of straw.
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Enclosed Rhyme
The rhyme scheme “abba” (that is, where the first and fourth lines, and the second and third lines rhyme).
Example
another day another way
its fun composing poetry
or fiction with sincerity
with words most every day
© Mick Talbot 2017
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BLANK VERSE
A type of poetry, distinguished by having a regular meter, but no rhyme. In English, the meter most commonly used with blank verse has been iambic pentameter. The iambic pentameter form often resembles the rhythms of speech. Verse that does not employ a rhyme scheme. Blank verse, however, is not the same as free verse because it employs a meter e.g. Paradise Lost by John Milton which is written in iambic pentameters.
Example

ANGELS HAVING FUN
White clouds, angels sledges, watch them flying,
wings assist their leaps, winds taunt them, laughing!
Blowing themselves out, what now they shout, what?
Angles look bemused, time to set the sun,
they blush, the clouds glow red, evensong calls!
Bells ring out, beckoning, the rave begins!
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Free verse
Definition
A term describing various styles of poetry that are not written using a strict meter or rhyme, but that still is recognizable as ‘poetry’ by virtue of complex patterns of one sort or another that readers can perceive to be part of a coherent whole.
My Example:

L. I. F. E

look at
l. i. f. e.
yeah life, a tiny word
describe it in one big word
supercalifragilisticexpialidocious
your serve
© Mick Talbot
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Serpent’s Tail
Rules:
Any line length, no set number of lines and no meter. To make the serpent, the last word of each line rhymes with the first word of the following line with the last line being the same as the first, so the serpent eats its own tail. The last part is the tricky bit.
Example by Jane Dougherty the inventor:
Becalmed on this sea,
we watch the sky for cloudfall,
stalled and immobile,
while hands clasp tight.
Night comes and no wind blows,
flows the tide into the dawn.
Born again in sunlight,
flight springs,
wings spread to fly,
sky calls us home.
Foam-flecked, we rise and find
behind is left all harm,
becalmed on this sea.
© Jane Dougherty 2017
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Three Squared: Invented by Jane Dougherty.
Three stanzas each three lines, each line 3*3 syllables, each stanza is rhymed AAA BBB CCC.
My Example:
FREE SPIRIT’S
walk down the road, wherever it leads
as free spirits, we sing to the trees
as free spirits, we do as we please

ease ourselves through many gaps
always alert, there are no perhaps
could cost us dearly, manmade traps

laps at the dew drops, many a deer
polluted earth, all living in fear
climate warming the heat doth us sear
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Kyrielle Poems
A Kyrielle is a French form of rhyming poetry written in quatrains (a stanza consisting of 4 lines), and each quatrain contains a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the poem consists of only eight syllables. There is no limit to the amount of stanzas a Kyrielle may have, but three is considered the accepted minimum.
Some popular rhyming schemes for a Kyrielle are: aabB, ccbB, ddbB, with B being the repeated line, or abaB, cbcB, dbdB.
Mixing up the rhyme scheme is possible for an unusual pattern of: axaZ, bxbZ, cxcZ, dxdZ, etc. with Z being the repeated line.
The rhyme pattern is completely up to the poet.
Example
NATURES CALL
Upon the oceans rising swell
Albatross, penguins, seals as well
On the surface, or down below
For eight months the life they’ll know

Natures call to procreation!
And miles from their destination.
Until that call, life was so slow
For eight months the life they’ll know

For most when destinations reached
Most babies born where mothers beached
Done, back to sea where they’ll grow
For eight months the life they’ll know
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Kyrielle Sonnet
A Kyrielle Sonnet consists of 14 lines (three rhyming quatrain stanzas and a non-rhyming couplet). Just like the traditional Kyrielle poem, the Kyrielle Sonnet also has a repeating line or phrase as a refrain (usually appearing as the last line of each stanza). Each line within the Kyrielle Sonnet consists of only eight syllables. French poetry forms have a tendency to link back to the beginning of the poem, so common practice is to use the first and last line of the first quatrain as the ending couplet. This would also re-enforce the refrain within the poem. Therefore, a good rhyming scheme for a Kyrielle Sonnet would be
IF ONLY
Where Fairies live not all is play.
From casting spells they do not stray.
Make good all that is bad, evil.
Bringing back good for the people.

Joy and laughter throughout the world.
Each spell a clever truth unfurled.
Nothing that they do is feeble.
Bringing back good for the people.

Jobs done, already for some fun,
granting wishes for everyone.
Making sure no more upheaval
Bringing back good for the people.

Where Fairies live not all is play.
Bringing back good for the people.
© Mick E Talbot 2017/66
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Kimo
A post-Haiku poetic form , consisting of three lines of 10, 7, and 6 syllables. This form of poetry was invented in Israel.
Example
GOOD MORNING
the twinkle in the eye of my lady
her pouting… sensual lips
I kissed her good morning
© Mick Talbot 2017
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A Limerick is a rhymed humorous or nonsense poem of five lines which originated in Limerick, Ireland. The Limerick has a set rhyme scheme of : a-a-b-b-a with a syllable structure of: 9-9-6-6-9.
there once was a lady from Lincoln
at whom the guys couldn’t stop winkin
she developed a cough
all the guys all ran off
to the pub to carry on drinking
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Nonet (Triple)
A nonet has nine lines. The first line has nine syllables, the second line eight syllables, the third line seven syllables, etc… until line nine that finishes with one syllable. It can be on any subject and rhyming is optional. I don’t know if triples are permissible but hey ho!
Example
DON’T CHANGE THE OLD FOR THE NEW
A sailor came home late one night, found
home without light, went upstairs
to bed, a sudden thought came
to his head, went into
his daughters room found
her dead, pinned to
her gown a
note it
read
o father I have done yee shame, borne
a son without a name, so dig
my grave, and dig it deep, and
place my baby at my
feet. on the top place
a dove to show
that I died
for love
so
all you fellows bare in mind girls true
love is hard to find, when you find
one good and true do not change
old for new, broken hearts
will mend, but my dead
ones rest now in
Heaven, I
cry for
them
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Grook
A form of short aphoristic poem characterized by irony, paradox, brevity, precise use of language, sophisticated rhythms and rhymes and often satiric nature.
Example
ARMY WAYS – BAD NEWS
Assembly, early morning parade to check,
Presence, and if one is dressed correctly.
Sargent then shouts out, “all those whose
Mum’s alive, take one step forward”
The whole platoon gladly took that step,
The Sargent, screaming, shouted out
“What are you moving for, Pte Talbot”?
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Idyll (Idyl) Poetry
Poetry that either depicts a peaceful, idealized country scene or a long poem telling a story about heroes of a bye gone age.
Example:
MEMORIES OF SUMMER BREEZES
I cannot see but I can smell,
The summer scented breeze.
The warmth of summer sun,
Reflected off the wilting trees.
Our walk today has been fun.
Wildflower meadows alive.
Its wildflowers I cannot see,
It is their scent and sound
That’s carried on that cooling,
Whispering, summer breeze.
© Mick Talbot 2017
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ABC POETRY
Poetry in which every word begins with a successive letter of the alphabet. The first word begins with A, the second with B, etc. (OR) A poem that has 5 lines that create a mood, picture, or feeling. Lines 1 through 4 are made up of words, phrases or clauses – and the first word of each line is in alphabetical order from the first word. Line 5 is one sentence, beginning with any letter.
Note: ABC as a form has been used to describe anything from an Abecedarian poem (above), to an Acrostic poem, and other things. ABC typically has been used as a catch-all for sequential alphabet poems that may not necessarily use the entire alphabet like an Abecedarian poem. So, in reality, “ABC” is just an acrostic poem using successive letters of the alphabet per line or stanza.
Example:
BEAUROCRACIE
All Beaurocracie Complicates Decisions Especially For Generating Hope. Instructions Jeopardising, Killing, Leaving Many Normal, Open People Quandering Recent Stipulations Tantamount to and Unquestionably Voicing War! Xenias Yearns Zeus!
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Ode
A lengthy lyric poem typically of a serious or meditative nature and having an elevated style and formal stanza structure. A classic ode is structured in three parts: the strophe, the antistrophe, and the epode. Different forms such as the homostrophic ode and the irregular ode also exist.
An Ode To My Muse
My muse, inspirations personified, does one confuse?
My shoulder naked, where once she sat, no,
she’s still there, yet silent I fear.
Even the power of telepathy gone. Have I done wrong?
Her eyes of jet, once I could read, blank me.
She turns, we both look out beyond infinity.
I know not what she seeks. I scan, but tis a void I see.
She turns again, looks into my eyes, I see India, Mumbai
A tear, a longing, she begs for me to say, goodbye.
I do, and heartbroken, I shed a tear, and look. then I ask, why?
Too late, she was gone. I looked again into the beyond.
Blew her a goodbye kiss. She will still be my muse.
For her spirit will always be my inspiration to write my poetry!
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Ottava Rima: The ottava rima stanza in English consists of eight iambic lines, usually iambic pentameters. Each stanza consists of three rhymes following the rhyme scheme a-b-a-b-a-b-c-c.
♥A LOVE OF MY LIFE♥
A love of my life nature, I’ve wondered?
Camera in hand I visit macro land.,
often to find most habitats plundered!

Mother nature would not ever of planned,
to destroy it, mankind its days numbered.
From verdant to yellow deserted sand,

My camera always at the ready flashed!
In anger at what was beauty, now trashed.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
© Mick Talbot 10:40/02/44/11/2017-11:19/02/44/11/2017
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Jueju
Jueju poems are always quatrains; or, more specifically, a matched pair of couplets, with each line consisting of five or seven syllables. The five-syllable form is called wujue, and the seven-syllable form qijue
WUJUE MY JEWEL
my night time jewel
clouded skies, cruel.
hidden, by the dark.
her scent, very stark.

come dawn, I found her
asleep, not a single stir.
now, my daytime jewel
my love, my life, fuel.

forty-seven years,
shed. so many tears,
happiness, and joy
first, a baby boy.

♥QIJUE INDIAN SUMMER♥
A British Indian summer
Made cold October warmer
Lucky were the birds and bees
It made all life feel at ease
Both © Mick Talbot 2017Qijue
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Questionku
3 lines
1-4, 2-5, 3-6 syllables.
Ending with a question.
Example:
Mighty oceans!
Suffer pollution!
Why not heed the warnings?
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Quintain: (English)
This is much more popular form of Quintet having no set measure or foot and has a rhyming scheme of a. b. a. b. b.
Example:
Thoughts have been planted,
that dogooders can be wrong,
by some folk, who have ranted,
their feelings very, very strong.
Carrying bad, and good along!
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Diminished Iambic Meter Potery
6 to 4 lines minimum diminished from 6 max to 4 min. iambic feet to 1. A new form, I am sure it is, I have checked and found nothing. If you do know different, please do let me know, thank you!
A TRICKLE GROWS
A trickle grows, made to feed its mother,
mighty ocean, separated at birth.
Clouds conceived, gestation random.
Temperature decides.
Wind guides baby
rivers.
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Villanelle
A 19-line poem consisting of five tercets and a final quatrain on two rhymes. The first and third lines of the first tercet repeat alternately as a refrain closing the succeeding stanzas and joined as the final couplet of the quatrain.
YOUR CONSCIENCE SPEAKING

the raging temper of the human race will be its downfall
they kill each other, abuse each other, and pollute the world
they show no respect for nature, they won’t be at the ball

they know not what wrong they do, and nature names do call
they’ll know soon enough when nature its wrath is unfurled
the raging temper of the human race will be its downfall

they think their right I don’t know how they have the gall
storms aplenty nature it has not the worst at them hurled
they show no respect for nature, they won’t be at the ball

there are those I know who have and always will give their all
who I am I you want to know, well I’m from another world
the raging temper of the human race will be its downfall

nature knows there is those of you who can stand tall
can catch any ball that nature throws even if its curled
they show no respect for nature, they won’t be at the ball

you still want to now know what I am at that I’m appalled
well I am your conscience and the conscience of the world
the raging temper of the human race will be its downfall
they show no respect for nature, they won’t be at the ball
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Rondeau:
A rondeau (plural rondeaux) is a form of French poetry with 15 lines written on two rhymes. Variant forms may have 10 or 13 lines. It makes use of refrains, repeated according to a certain stylized pattern. It was customarily regarded as a challenge to arrange for these refrains to contribute to the meaning of the poem in as succinct and poignant a manner as possible. The rondeau consists of thirteen lines of eight syllables, plus two refrains (which are half lines, each of four syllables), employing, altogether, only three rhymes. It has three stanzas and its rhyme scheme is as follows: (1) A A B B A (2) A A B with refrain: C (3) A A B B A with concluding refrain C. The refrain must be identical with the beginning of the first line.
WHEN CHERRY TREES BLOOM
when cherry trees bloom, early spring
for pollinators life saving
all cherry growers find it great
sweet cherries they can relate
for most folk too have a craving

cherry picking, gratifying
tasting very satisfying
cherry brandy too its great
when cherry trees bloom

sweet cherry pie with double cream
mid day break, pickers eat their dream
their working day now nearly done
stained red clouds painted by the sun
when cherry trees bloom
© Mick Talbot 2017
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LAST WORD, rules:
‘LAST WORD’ poetry, another new form invented by me, (Mick Talbot), unless you know different, feedback, please
Format:
[1] 5 lined stanza’s, as many as you like. The fifth line of each the refrain, and must remain the same throughout the piece.
[2] 2 stanzas minimum.
[3] All lines in iambic tetrameter, including the refrain.
[4] In the first line of each stanza the last word must be identical (LAST WORD), poetry.
[5] Rhyming schemes: ABABC. AABBC, ABBAC
LAND
They drift in from far distant land.
Many species… of weeds and trees.
Some turn out to be rather grand.
Many snakes… slits in driftwood squeeze.
None needed help from friendly hands.

Most don’t survive the foreign land.
Too cold… too warm… their lives will end.
The climate good… form fresh new brands.
In niches… nooks and crannies blend.
None needed help from friendly hands.

Sand similar as their old land.
Come spring if they all made it through,
they’ll breed… they’re future safe… so grand.
New generations life anew.
None needed help from friendly hands

Season of peril in new land.
Wintertime most will die… perish
Seeds germinate… Snakes breed… How grand
Fauna… flora… new land cherish
None needed help from friendly hands
© Mick Talbot 2017
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NINETTE
Ninette nine lines, each increasing in one syllable, then at the midpoint, decreasing again. The form, when centered, appears like a paper lantern. The first and last word may be the same, antonyms, or synonyms.

HEED NATURE
My happiness!
Shout out to nature.
Trust in her for she helps.
Her sunny face, full of smiles.
She greets the world, her warmth a gift.
One day respite, grab those rays.
Winter waits up Falls sleeve.
Heed natures warning!
Have no regrets.
© Mick Talbot 2017

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Quatern:
A Quatern is a sixteen line French form composed of four quatrains. It is similar to the Kyrielle and the Retourne. It has a refrain that is in a different place in each quatrain. The first line of stanza one is the second line of stanza two, the third line of stanza three, and fouth line of stanza four. A quatern has eight syllables per line. It does not have to be iambic or follow a set rhyme scheme. 1st stanza, lines 1, 2, 3, 4. 2nd, lines 5, 6=1, 7, 8. 3rd, lines 9, 10, 11=1, 12, 4th lines 13, 14, 15, 16=1
Example
TRUST
Trust in true love of each other,
of all natural life, not easy.
Nature, as you will discover.
Our sustenance, some find queasy.

Preservation, the need to eat.
Trust in true love of each other.
To survive eat protein, real meat.
You can also try veg fodder.

Omnivores, please don’t shudder.
It is a scientific fact.
Trust in true love of each other.
Whatever, we have to adapt.

Eating for self-preservation
Whatever you choose, no bother
To survive for procreation.
Trust in true love of each other.
© Mick Talbot
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Footle
A footle is a 2 line, 2 syllable trochaiac monometer poem with an integral title suitable for light, witty, pertinent, topical verse.
Example
DING DONG
happy
chappy

his day
birthday

naughty
sortie

boke toy
smashed joy

spoilt fun
smacked bum

enough said
now bed

partying
starting

ding dong
rave on
©Mick Talbot
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Epigram: A very short, ironic and witty poem usually written as a brief couplet or quatrain. The term is derived from the Greek epigramma meaning inscription.

The masters of our suffering world
Their woes are on people unfurled

Humpty Dumpty, a great friend
Now eaten took to long to mend

Always wanted an epigram
A few now, well I be damn!
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Epulaeryu
The “Epulaeryu” poem is about delicious food. It consists of seven lines with thirty-three (33) syllables. 7,5,7,5,5,3,1, seventh line ends with an exclamation mark. Each line has one thought relating to the main course. Therefore, this new poetic form, the Epulaeryu, which has corresponding lines built around the main course, and ending with an exclamation point, concludes with the ending line expressing the writer’s excitement and feelings about the poem.
Example:
Strawberry Jelly (Epulaeryu)
Sweet red strawberry jelly
Layered to suspend
Fresh strawberries mid jelly
Topped with fresh whipped cream
Served with soft ice cream
A sundae
Treat!
© Mick Talbot 2017
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Kwansaba
The Kwansaba is a non-rhyming form that consists of seven lines of seven words per line and each word cannot include more than seven letters unless it’s a proper noun. It’s based on Kwanzaa, the African American holiday that celebrates seven principles.
Example:

REAL LIFE
Laughter, fun, joy for all the world!
Not just holiday time, forever and ever!
When kids can play, mum, dad too!
From fear, much needed respite, all happy!
Two weeks of opulent, tender loving care!
Back home, fear faced again, real life!
Family can look back, all fun, snapped!
© Mick Talbot 2017

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Lento

Guidelines:

A poetic form created by Lencio Dominic Rodrigues, the Lento is named after it’s creator, taken from his first name Lencio and rhymed to Cento, an existing form of poetry.
A Lento consists of two quatrains with a fixed rhyme scheme of abcbdefe as the second and forth lines of each stanza must rhyme. To take it a step further, but not required, try rhyming the first and third lines as well as the second and forth lines of each stanza in this rhyming pattern: ababcdcd. The fun part of this poem is thrown in here as all the FIRST words of each verse should rhyme. There is no fixed syllable structure to the Lento, but keeping a good, flowing rhythm is recommended.
For an added challenge, one may write a four-verse Lento and call it a Double Lento, or a six-versed Lento to become a Triple Lento. A Lento of eight verses and more is called a Lento chain.

LET NATURE LEAD

refine our ways… let nature lead
define the paths of all creation
aline the equilibrium… succeed
fine weather helps procreation…

should we continue to live a lie
would lead to our total devastation
could be that all world life will die
good… no… but it could be a realisation

rife now… worldwide pollution…
life is facing mass extinction…
strife… mother natures solution
knife in her back… total dereliction…

can we… all life stand a chance…
plan a future… a new way of life
ban all synthetics… might enhance
l.a.n… working together… suffice…

pollution must be stopped this day…
solution… stop all wilful distillation…
dilution of the atmosphere… no way…
resolution… man… nature… reconciliation

why do I persist in shouting out…
cry I do… at all the hate… and greed
sigh at all in denial… why… the doubt…
rely on the scientists… please heed
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~*~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
© Mick Talbot 2012

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Tanka

A Japanese poem of five lines, the first and third composed of five syllables and the others seven. In Japanese, tanka is often written in one straight line, but in English and other languages, we usually divide the lines into the five syllabic units: 5-7-5-7-7.

Each tanka is divided into two segments. The first three lines are the upper phrase, and the last two lines are the lower phrase. The upper phrase typically contains an image, and the lower phrase exposes the poet’s ideas about that image.

Tanka poems are similar to a haiku but have two additional lines and usually feature as its subject very strong emotion or love. Conversely, Haikus are typically about nature.

Example

Since the nightingale
kept soundless, its song’s echo
renders me stone deaf.
If it would know my sorrow
would it maybe sing again?
© Vasile Moldovan

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FORMS OF POETRY OLD NEW & RECENTLY INVENTED
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Best regards and best wishes to all,

Mick
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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
My gratitude to all especially you my followers, who never fail to inspire me, either by your comments, likes, and your own work, I thank you all. Those who stamped their mark on my heart,(in no particular order), follow: Colleen, Ina, Yasmin, Willow, Sarah, Mirian, Elsie, Judy, Jules, Sangbad, TJ, Reena, Sammi, Vivian, ZoolonLinda, XeniaJane, Kat, and many more. I will add hyperlinks to all. Many, many thanks to you all.
Sites:
WordPress
PoetrySoup
Shadow Poetry
Wikipedia
Google
Simply Haiku

My thanks to you all!
Mick
Mick E Talbot
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